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20121201
20121231
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for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
the next two years, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. that's exactly it. we want local entrepreneurs to take advantage of the faster seed that google fiber will bring and develop. you know, the sky is the limit. >> and how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. now we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment, for top talent to come, stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day, if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding an aunt ru pentrepreneu to take a risk and do that in your community is going to grow jobs and grow the economy. >> for now, dreams are driving wild on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas. >>
, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is salt lake what you wanted. >> exactly -- this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. we want to take advantage of the faster speeds that google fire will bring and develop. the sky's the limit. >> reporter: how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> reporter: the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment for top talent to come and stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding that entrepreneur, willing to take a risk in your community is going to grow jobs and ultimately the economy. >> reporter: for now, dreams are growing wild out on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas.
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